On the sixth of August 1945 the US military aircraft dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and three days later on Nagasaki. The question whether it was necessary to do it is still widely debated nowadays. The ethical aspect of America’s decision to make Japan surrender in this way causes many intense and hot discussions in the modern media, among politicians and reporters. 

I think the USA, first of all, should have attempted more diplomatic negotiations before using the weapons. The participation of other countries in these negotiations could make them more effective and show Japan that the whole world is against its military aggression. Secondly, the USA together with the global community could impose very strict economic sanctions on Japan making any international trade impossible. Additional political, social and cultural isolation could also bring Japan’s capitulation closer. I am sure there were at least some effective ways that would force Japan to surrender, but Harry Truman chose to use nuclear weapons despite the fact that even scientists who developed the bomb, for example Dr. Leo Szilard, were against its usage on people. However, I do not think that Truman did it due to any other reason than protecting the American nation. 

To conclude, it is absolutely unacceptable to cause so much damage to the peaceful population of any country in the world. Such behavior could not be justified by the necessity to force the Japanese authorities to capitulate faster. Dropping the bomb obviously reached its purpose as on the fifteenth of August 1945 Japan surrendered, but the fact that these two bombs killed about 300 thousand people only during the first four months after the dropping is abhorrent and frightening. Even more people died afterwards and their death was not instant and painless. Nothing can justify so much human suffering.

Question: Imagining you represent the USA at the negotiations with Japan, what your strongest argument would be to persuade Japan to surrender

Sep 11, 2018 in Economy
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